Drifting birds of prey use predictable winds during migration

European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus soaring in the wind.

European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus soaring in the wind.

This post is a press release from the authors of Journal of Animal Ecology paper “Seasonal detours by soaring migrants shaped by wind regimes along the East Atlantic Flyway” by Wouter M. G. Vansteelant et al. Issued by University of Amsterdam.

Birds of prey let themselves be carried by predictable winds
At the start of autumn, several billion migratory birds take flight for a long, adventurous journey to Africa. How do they manage to complete this difficult journey successfully year after year? To find out, a team of researchers from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) tracked the behaviour of migrating European honey buzzards using small GPS backpacks. They combined GPS data with meteorological models to show how these migratory birds travel via complicated detours to make use of predictable weather patterns. They do so especially over the Sahara Desert, an inhospitable landscape they need to cross as quickly as possible. Continue reading

Salmon smolts find safety in numbers

JAE-2015-00769.R2This post is a press release from the authors of Journal of Animal Ecology paper “Predator swamping reduces predation risk during nocturnal migration of juvenile salmon in a high-mortality landscape” by Nathan B. Furey et al. Press release issued by The University of British Colombia

Using tags surgically implanted into thousands of juvenile salmon, University of British Colombia researchers have discovered that many fish die within the first few days of migration from their birthplace to the ocean. Continue reading

Accurate timing of migration prolongs life expectancy in pike

This blog post is a press release from the authors of the Journal of Animal Ecology paper “Causes and consequences of repeatability, flexibility and individual fine-tuning of migratory timing in pike” by Petter Tibblin published today. Press release issued by Linnaeus University

Animal migration is a spectacular phenomenon that has fascinated humans for a long time. It is widely assumed that appropriate timing of migratory events is crucial for survival, but the causes and consequences of individual variation in timing are poorly understood. New research based on migrating pike in the Baltic Sea and published in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Animal Ecology reveals how behaviours such as punctuality, flexibility and fine-tuning influence life expectancy in fish. Continue reading